Nermeen Arastu is a Clinical Law Professor and Co-Director of the Immigrant & Non-Citizen Rights Clinic. Prior to joining CUNY's faculty, Nermeen was a litigation associate at Simpson Thacher & Bartlett, LLP and a staff attorney at the Asian American Legal Defense and Education Fund (AALDEF). At AALDEF, Nermeen led the Immigrant Rights Program and Post-9/11 Civil Liberties Project.  Through the course of her pro bono work at Simpson Thacher and tenure at AALDEF, Nermeen managed an immigration docket which included deportation defense, suppression, asylum, citizenship and green card interviews and various other immigration processes. Additionally, while at AALDEF, she oversaw monthly immigration clinics in conjunction with various community-based organizations, litigated matters relating to zoning and houses of worship, addressed anti-Muslim bias in the immigration system, and advocated against racial and religious profiling and law enforcement surveillance.

Nermeen has also worked at the Legal Assistance Centre of Namibia and in the Immigrant Women Program at Legal Momentum (formerly NOW Legal Defense) where she focused on policy relating to gender-based violence. Nermeen is a  graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Law School and the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

 

Email

nermeen.arastu@law.cuny.edu

Phone

(718) 340-4142

Office

5-315

Clinic Faculty & Staff

 
 
 

Frequently Asked Questions for CUNY Students & Other New Yorkers Impacted by the Termination of DACA

September 27, 2017 – New York –
This document is a FAQ resource for CUNY students & other New Yorkers impacted by the termination of DACA. Though we still work towards permanent status for those who have been impacted by this and other destabilizing immigration policies, we have received many questions from CUNY community members who are concerned about losing status and how to potentially navigate life without documents. With this resource we hope to address initial questions that CUNY community members may have about immigration status, work authorization, professional licensing, parental planning, law enforcement interactions, healthcare and more.

If you would like to see this document translated in other languages, please let us know. We will be posting it in Spanish on our website in the coming week. This document is the product of a collaboration between the Immigrant and Non-Citizen Rights Clinic, Health Law Practice Clinic and The Planning with Parents Project at the CUNY School of Law. Do reach out to us if you have any further questions on this and/or related matters.