Fall 2018 Second Year Required Courses

Administrative Law/Public Institutions and Law
3 credits – Professor N. Gomez-Velez
This course provides an overview of administrative law, the legal rules and procedures that govern administrative agencies.  The course will cover the creation and functions of federal administrative agencies, their rulemaking, adjudicatory and policymaking functions, executive and legislative oversight and judicial review of agency action.  This course satisfies CUNY Law School’s administrative law graduation requirement.

 

Constitutional Structures and the Law   
3 credits – Professor S. Loffredo and Professor F. Deale (full-time) and Professor N. Gomez-Velez (part-time)
The course examines federalism and national separation of powers as core values and structural elements of the Constitution. It examines the nature and scope of the powers the Constitution vests in the three branches of the national government, the interrelationships between those branches, the distribution of powers among local, state and federal governments, and the ways in which these constitutional structures and relationships impact democratic processes, individual rights and the advancement (or interference with) core constitutional values, including democratic governance, equal citizenship, individual liberty and the rule of law.  The course also attends to questions of constitutional interpretation, historical development of constitutional doctrines and the role of changing social understandings in the evolution of constitutional law.

 

Evidence and Lawyering in the Public Interest
4 credits - Professor N. Chernoff (full-time)

The primary goal of this course is for you to develop an understanding of the most important Federal Rules of Evidence (FREs). An understanding of these rules will equip you to represent and counsel your future clients. Understanding these rules will also assist you with the Evidence portion of the Bar Exam.  In addition, this course will sharpen your advocacy skills because you will practice crafting legal arguments, interpreting non-judicial and judicial law, and you will develop an understanding of the structure of a trial. This course requires you to complete extensive reading, multiple quizzes, and assignments for every class.



Evidence and Lawyering in the Public Interest
4 credits - Professor S. Valentine (full-time)
4 credits - Professor S. Valentine (part-time)
The primary goal of this course is for you to develop an understanding of the most important Federal Rules of Evidence (FREs).  An understanding of these rules will equip you to represent and counsel your future clients regardless of the type of law you hope to practice. Understanding these rules will also assist you with the Evidence portion of the Bar Exam.   This course requires extensive reading supplemented with out of class assignments.

 

Property: Law and the Marker Economy III
4 credits – Professor A. White
The law of Property is fundamental to all economic activity in our society. It determines the rights of individuals and society to use and possess land and things, and even intangibles like songs and shares of a corporation.  Our study will cover primarily rules regarding land and buildings, i.e. real property, leaving topics like intellectual property and sales of goods for other courses. The objectives of the course, and the competencies that will be assessed, are 1) to learn the basic rules and principles of property law, 2) to apply those rules and principles to analyze case problems, 3) to learn skills that lawyers use in advising clients in buying, selling and leasing property and in protecting their housing tenure, 4) to learn related lawyering skills, including collaboration, oral presentation and advocacy, client counseling and planning, negotiation, drafting, and policy analysis, 5) to understand and critique values and policies embedded in property law,  6) to incorporate social justice lawyering into property law practice, and 7) to learn to use relevant property law practice technology. Class discussion will be supplemented with short video lectures, on-line quizzes, and graded and ungraded written assignments.

 

Property: Law and the Market Economy III
4 credits – Professor R. Storrow
Property is organized around the concept of title--what it is, how it can be acquired, and how it can be transferred. The course explores this theme within two distinct jurisprudential arenas: (1) the role of possession in defining interests in personal property, present and future estates in land, and lesser interests in land such as tenancies, easements and covenants, and (2) the zoning powers of government and the constitutional law of eminent domain.  The course is designed to encourage the study of property law from a public interest perspective, the primary dilemma being to balance private interests in ownership with the public interest in promoting human welfare.

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