Graduate Fellowship

The Law School awards approximately twelve Graduate Fellowships to incoming students each academic year. Because Admissions Committee members identify potential candidates for Graduate Fellowships from our pool of admitted students, there is no application for the Fellowship. The Admissions Committee selects potential candidates based on their strong entering academic indicators, demonstrated capacity for leadership, individual accomplishments, history of commitment to public interest/social justice, likelihood of contribution to the educational environment and to the legal profession, and their identifiable connection to or interest in working with populations that have traditionally been underserved by the law or underrepresented in the profession.

Graduate Fellows are awarded a stipend of $10,000 plus in-state tuition. In addition to the stipend and in-state tuition waiver, Graduate Fellows are also given the opportunity to work as research assistants and/or teaching assistants on faculty scholarship projects (up to a maximum limit of 225 hours). Fellows are often matched with projects in their own area of interest and thereby gain immeasurable experience through this work. The Fellowship will continue throughout the three years of law school, as long as a Graduate Fellow remains an enrolled student at the Law School and maintains a GPA of 3.0 or above.

 

Admissions Scholarship

Depending on the availability of funds, the Law School awards several Admissions Scholarships each academic year. Potential candidates for the scholarship are identified from our pool of admitted students. Because Admission Committee members identify potential candidates for the Admissions Scholarship from our pool of admitted students there is no application for the scholarship.

The Admissions Committee's recommendations are based on numerous factors such as the admitted student's reasons for wanting to attend CUNY School of Law; economic, social, or other obstacles overcome prior to applying; indications of personal initiative; likelihood of contribution to the educational environment and to the legal profession; background, and their connection to or interest in working with populations that have traditionally been underserved by the law or underrepresented in the profession. The Scholarship will continue throughout the three years of law school, as long as the student remains an enrolled student at the Law School and maintains a GPA of 3.0 or above.

 

Scholarship Retention Data

The chart below contains scholarship retention data the Law School provides to the American Bar Association.

Students Matriculating In

# Entering With Conditional Scholarships

# Whose Conditional Scholarships Have Since Been Reduced or Eliminated

Academic Year 2014–15

24

0

Academic Year 2013–14

24

1

Academic Year 2012–13

25

0

Academic Year 2011–12

30

3

 
 

External Scholarship Opportunities

This scholarship list below contains only a limited list of outside scholarships. Any information we receive regarding outside scholarships or grants is published here. The Law School has no connection with these organizations unless otherwise indicated. Applications and further information, unless otherwise indicated, must be requested by the student to the organization directly. The list is solely to provide a starting point for CUNY Law students. Many of the scholarship programs are restricted by ethnic, religious, or regional affiliation.

In addition to our list, there may be other educational funds available to you. These opportunities may require some research on your part. Check your city, state, or local bar associations, your religious group, employers, labor unions, civic organizations, and alumni associations. You may be eligible for little-known scholarships.

Please keep in mind that any scholarship funds received will likely replace, not supplement, other eligible need-based aid. If your need has already been met by your financial aid package, and you receive an outside scholarship award, the Law School is federally mandated to reduce your need-based aid by the amount of the award, if necessary. This will ensure that you have not been over-packaged and have not received more aid than that for which you are eligible.

There are also a variety of scholarship search programs available on the Internet. You may visit the following sites to locate additional sources of financial aid.

 

Additional Federal and Other Student Aid Opportunities

  • The AmeriCorps Program provides full-time educational awards in return for community service work. You can work before, during, or after your post-secondary education, and you can use the funds either to pay current educational expenses or to repay federal student loans. For more information, call 1-800-942-2677. Information is also available at www.americorps.org.
  • The student Internet gateway to the U.S. government, www.students.gov, provides access to government resources to assist students in planning and paying for their education. This Web site is a federal initiative designed to make interacting with the government easier for students. In addition to finding financial aid information, students can use the Web site to file their taxes, search for a job, and take advantage of other government services.
  • Public libraries are an excellent source of information on state and private sources of aid.
  • If you (or your spouse) are a veteran or the dependent of a veteran, veterans' educational benefits may be available. Check with your local U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs office. Information is also available at www.gibill.va.gov.
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Announcing the Luis Sanjurjo Endowed Scholarship Established by the Hamill Family

CUNY School of Law is proud to announce its first endowed scholarship, established in memory of Luis Sanjurjo, a civil rights lawyer, literary agent and professor at Medgar Evers College... More »