Evidence A

Professor: Nina Chernoff
Class: Evidence A – This course centers on three areas: evidence, advocacy skills, and a theoretical understanding of dispute resolution. In each area, students acquire practical skills necessary to the lawyering role and examine litigation in a broader context, encouraging in-depth understanding of the structure of evidentiary rules, as well as the possibility of alternatives. Doctrinal coverage includes the Federal Rules of Evidence, as well as the common law and New York statutes defining the scope of privileges. Students are challenged not only to master this thicket of rules and their many exceptions, but also to develop an understanding of how they affect the fact-finding process, the development of a theory of the case, the viability of litigation, and the unfolding of the story if the case finally reaches the courthouse.

Days & Times: Mon & Wed 10:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Room #: 1/202

Frequently asked questions

Where should I sit: Please sit in the section that is on Professor Chernoff’s far left. Her students sit in the middle and on the right.

Am I required to stay the entire class? May I get up to go to the restroom during class? No, you are not required to stay the entire time and yes you may leave to use the restroom. Please just be mindful of the other students and leave quietly.

Should I introduce myself to professor Chernoff  before class begins or stay after to say hello? You are welcome to but it isn’t required.

May I participate in the class, raise my hand to ask or answer a question? That would not be appropriate for this class.

Is there a cap on the number of guests who can observe per class? No

Are there test days that the class will not be open for observations? Yes, October 2 and November 13.

Professional Responsibility B

Professor: Franklin Seigel
Class: – Professional Responsibility B – The class will introduce students to the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the New York Rules of Professional Conduct within the context of social justice lawyering to prepare students for admission to the bar and the ethical practice of law. Students will explore the ethical complexities that exist in the practice of law, especially those raised when representing clients who may be marginalized by our society or when engaging in social change litigation. Foundational concepts of professionalism, professional judgment, and the effective and ethical practice of law will be examined using a variety of formats including case law, client narratives, and simulations. It is recommended that the course be approved in both a two- and a three-credit offering to allow flexibility in course planning and permit the law school to respond to developments in this subject area and accommodate differences among faculty in approach and depth of coverage of the topics and issues described above, including the nature and length of course assignments. For students starting law school during or after the fall of 2012, Professional Responsibility is required for any student seeking admission to the New York bar. This is a required course effective with the entering class of 2015.

Days & Times: Thursday  6:15 PM – 8:15 PM

Room #:1-205

Frequently asked questions

Where should I sit: Please sit in the back row on the sides

Am I required to stay the entire class? May I get up to go to the restroom during class? No, you are not required to stay the entire time and yes you may leave to use the restroom. Please just be mindful of the other students and leave quietly so as to not disrupt the class.

Should I introduce myself to Professor Seigel before class begins or stay after to say hello? You are welcome to but it isn’t required.

May I raise my hand to ask or answer a question? That would not be appropriate for this class.

Is there a cap on the number of guests who can observe per class? 2 to 3 students per class.

Are there test days that the class will not be open for observations? Yes, October 12.

Liberty, Equality & Due Process (LEDP)

Professor: Jeena Shah
Class: Liberty, Equality & Due Process (LEDP) – This course provides legal and historical perspectives on liberty and equality by examining the law’s impact on racial and gender equality and sexual orientation. The historical, social, political, and economic context – particularly the development of the Bill of Rights, slavery, the anti-slavery movement and Reconstruction, the rise and fall of white supremacy, the labor movement, and the emergence of gender equality – provides the backdrop against which students trace the development of the interpretation and application of the standards of equal protection and due process. Studying the moral and political theories that have been used to shape and justify these Constitutional doctrines provides both a framework for understanding and a springboard for critique. This course challenges students to analyze their own experiences through the lens of the law and to understand how the law may have shaped their values and perceptions -or how it might be used to shift society’s values and perceptions.

Days & Times: Tues & Thurs 4:00 PM-5:30 PM

Room #: 1/203

Frequently asked questions

Where should I sit: Please sit in the very back of the room on the sides (not the middle section) where there are usually empty seats.

Am I required to stay the entire class? May I get up to go to the restroom during class? You should arrive in class early since Professor Shah begins class promptly at 4:00 PM, but you can leave early as long as you are quiet and aren’t too disruptive in that process.  Yes, you can leave for the restroom when necessary, again please be quiet and mindful not to disrupt the class.

Should I introduce myself to professor Shah  before class begins or stay after to say hello? Yes, please introduce yourself before class begins.

May I  my hand to ask or answer a question? That would not be appropriate for this class.

Is there a cap on the number of guests who can observe per class? The class is very full, so 2-3 visitors per class.

Are there test days that the class will not be open for observations? Yes, Tuesday, October 17.